Student worker Emma Young passes out swag bags to a student researcher at SUURA 2018

About the Office

What is student research?

Undergraduate research is an inquiry or exploration of a topic within an academic discipline by a student that makes an original contribution to the field of study.

Getting involved in student research is a great way to further explore your academic passions and interests. Research opportunities are available for all academic disciplines. The Student Research Program can assist you with organizing, funding, presenting, and even publishing your own research. On this page you will find information about the variety of resources available to you as student researchers. Click on any of the colorful tiles above for more details about all things related to student research at Seattle University.

About Research Grants

The Student Research Program supports Seattle University students by awarding small research project grants, giving students from any discipline the opportunity to start or expand their research. Activities funded by a grant might include travel to present at or attend a conference, a trip to an archive or field site to conduct research, expenses for a community outreach project, research-related supplies, or other opportunities where students incur expenses directly related to conducting research, so long as there is a tangible result or outcome from that study.

Student researcher Annet Rangel presents their research at SUURA 2018

Four student researcher discuss their findings on a panel at SUURA 2018

About SUURA

Have you written a great research paper? Have you produced meaningful creative work? Have you written an essay for a Core class that you’re proud of? Have you and a team completed some exemplary community outreach? Has your laboratory research produced sufficient results to draw conclusions? If so, take your work to the next level by presenting your research at the Seattle University Undergraduate Research Association (SUURA), a conference of student scholarship. This annual celebration of student research will take place on May 31, 2019. Undergraduate students in all disciplines and in the Core are eligible to apply. Students may be nominated by their faculty to present, may be asked to present as part of their major requirements, or may self-select to present individually or in research pairs or groups.

About SUURJ

The Seattle University Undergraduate Research Journal (SUURJ) is a peer-reviewed, open-access, online journal that showcases the research achievements of SU undergraduate students. The journal is a faculty-led, student-centered project published annually in May. Research published in this interdisciplinary journal includes original quantitative and qualitative work that students conduct during their academic studies, including theoretical works, policy analyses, research-based editorial pieces, Core writing, and other modes.

Housed in the College of Arts and Sciences and the English Department, the journal is also a co-curricular project that provides student editors with editorial apprenticeship experience. Through a year-long program, student editors learn the principles of editing and publishing, share stewardship of the journal, and earn up to 10 course credits.

Student editors collaborate on SUURJ volume 2

Seattle University students abroad examining a skeleton

About Campus Research Initiatives

Seattle University has vibrant research initiatives taking place on every part of campus. No matter what your major is or will be, there are opportunities for undergraduates to be involved in hands-on scholarly endeavors. Our Campus Research Initiatives section can direct you to opportunities for faculty-student collaboration, lab work, annual showcases and project days, as well as education and outreach abroad initiatives that lead to student research.

Applications and Deadlines

    Explore SUURA

    Presenting at SUURA and publishing my original research in SUURJ allowed me to visualize my future as a researcher. This experience reaffirmed my passion in scientific inquiry. My research began with a question during my junior year statistics class. Rather than the question being answered, at the end of the process, I was left with better questions. I now work as a research scientist and feel prepared to share my ideas and inquiries with other researchers.

    Sufia Ahmad Psychology major '18